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December 17th, 2013
December 17th, 2013

NOTES ON THE ROAD: December 15 - 17

From the Pacific to the Desert
From the Pacific to the Desert
As you may have read in these pages, we recently purchased a waterfront cottage in LaHave, Nova Scotia (at the mouth of the LaHave River and just west of Lunenburg on the South Shore), but realizing we had the time and the means to escape the cold weather we hatched the ensuing plot.  Our friends, Barry and Donna of Victoria, had sent us a video clip  of an older couple, in a still older Rolls Royce, who had travelled the subcontinent of India.  Realizing that we had our own aging vehicle, an ex-military Land Rover Defender, at our disposal, we decided to get home by the longest, warmest, most interesting route possible: south to the Mexican border, east through California, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas to San Antonio.  In San Antonio we would leave the Defender in a secure place, fly to Mexico City, bus to Veracruz (to visit daughter Rachel, son-in-law Roy and grandkids Roycito and Valentina).  Depending on our inclination, we would then wander about Mexico for a while before returning to San Antonio and driving through Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and on to Florida for a lengthy pit stop.  We would head North in the Spring but the details of the route would have to simmer in the pot for now.  After all, there are no guarantees that breakdown on the road, health issues, or an offer to sail a schooner to Tahiti might serve to stir up things and alter even the best laid plans.


That evening San Diego hosted it´s boat ´parade of lights´ that took place outside our front door, and it was a fitting ´bon voyage´ for our last night on the Pacific side of the continent.

December 16/17

The following morning, we headed east along highway 8 and soon found ourselves climbing slowly to reach an altitude of 4,000 plus feet in the Cleveland National Forest.  We soon plunged down the other side to the desert and sand dunes on the Mexican border where we were amused to discover we were now well below sea level (according to marks on the water towers).  After a run of 175 miles we stopped in the sleepy, ´snow¬-bird´ capital of Yuma, Arizona where we checked in for two nights.

“Are you here for the dentist?” asked the friendly motel manager.  We shook our heads but learned that many Canadians and Americans check in to Yuma for a week and have their teeth fixed across the border in Mexico at half the cost of U.S. dentists.  Happy hour is served each day from 5-7 p.m.  We wondered whether the drinks would be the local equivalent of a Cuban all inclusive but discovered that the manager was dispensing impressive cocktails and good wines with many a ´snow bird´ lining up for refills.  Appetizers was a large heated pan of chicken wings which, to gauge the pyramid on each plate, served as dinner for the regulars.  The impressive gnawing and cracking of bones around the room spoke eloquently of the inexpensive dental work taking place across the border!



More Images

The Open Road Ahead
The Open Road Ahead
Into the Mountains
Into the Mountains
A Huge Pile of Rocks!
A Huge Pile of Rocks!
The High Plateau
The High Plateau
More Rocks and the Landy's Competent Driver!
More Rocks and the Landy's Competent Driver!
Down to the Desert and the Mexican Border Mountains in the Background
Down to the Desert and the Mexican Border Mountains in the Background
Derelict Railway Cars in the Desert
Derelict Railway Cars in the Desert
Fertile Valley and Mexican Mountains
Fertile Valley and Mexican Mountains
The Desert Just Outside Yuma, Arizona
The Desert Just Outside Yuma, Arizona
From San Pedro to Yuma!
From San Pedro to Yuma!

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